Inspirational
  • fr-FR
  • English (UK)

Inspirational

Expert Author Deborah Chelette-Wilson

I've only recently come to realize how much the impact of shame has had in my life. I realize that shame and guilt are different. Guilt can be good because it lets me know when I have harmed another and is a reflection of my behavior that needs to change. Shame however, is feeling bad about who I am not what I've done. The important adults in my life didn't realize that their repetitive negative 'only kidding' comments made me feel that who I was had no value, was bad and no one else would want me. The longer and more often those experiences happened the heavier the shame became until it became a cloak I wore every day.

Expert Author Deborah Chelette-Wilson

Growing up as an Air Force brat and, then as a military wife, this statement of truth was just a given. I grew up knowing about the sacrifices military men, women, and their families made every day and down through history. I knew that those sacrifices were not in vain as I daily enjoyed the freedoms my country offered me even when I disagreed with the decisions of those in power. This year as I waited in our small town park for the fireworks to begin I pondered a different kind of freedom that isn't free either.

As I was enjoying the peacefulness of our small town 4th of July celebration I recalled my wish to feel comfortable in my own body. I decided on my 50th birthday that though I looked calm on the outside my engine seemed to always be running on the inside. No one could see it but I could feel it.

Expert Author Deborah Chelette-Wilson

In 1909 while listening to a Mother's Day Sermon at the Central Methodist Episcopal Church in Spokane, Washington, Sonora Smart Dodd became inspired. She wanted a celebration to honor and commemorate our fathers and forefathers and call it Father's Day. It is believed that the first Father's Day observance was on June 19, 1910 in Spokane, Washington. She wanted to celebrate fathers like her own, William Smart, who was a Civil War veteran. After her mother died when she was 16 years old, he raised her and her 5 siblings. She came up with the idea to wear red roses to honor living fathers and white ones for deceased fathers. The idea didn't catch on very quickly. She received support from the YWCA, the YMCA and churches but it took many years for it to become an official holiday. Many people found her idea laughable, making jokes and writing satires in local newspapers.

Expert Author Deborah Chelette-Wilson

I took a new turn on my pathway of spiritual growth and development when I became aware of the National Women's History Project and their goal to write women back into history. It was a surprise turn, one that I didn't see coming. It is one that will be taking me to new places internally and externally. Discovering the National Women's History Project caused me to hit my pause button and take stock of my ignorance about women's history. I realized that most of my role models from history had been men. I don't feel there was anything wrong with that as I learned and emulated many helpful characteristics. However, I realized that I also bought into the cultural beliefs about the inferiority of women. I was appalled by the realization that unconsciously I had accepted many of the negative cultural beliefs about females that I had grown up with even when I rebelled against them.